File
Authors
Keywords
D2-selective dopamine receptor antagonist
dopamine
electrooculogram
fast oscillation
metoclopramide hydrochloride
Abstract
Fast oscillation (FO) of an electrooculogram (EOG) was recorded in both eyes of 10 healthy volunteers before and after administration of metoclopramide hydrochloride (MTCL), a D2-selective dopamine receptor antagonist, paying particular attention to sex concerning sensitivity to dopamine in young subjects. Healthy volunteers were divided into male and female groups; 5 males (10 eyes) aged 21 to 23 years (average, 21.8 years) and 5 females (10 eyes) aged 19 to 25 years (average, 21.8 years). As an FO parameter, the dfFO (the averaged difference in ?V between maximum amplitude in the dark period and minimum amplitude in the light period during FO measurement) was evaluated. The mean level of dfFO significantly increased between phase A (the initial 10 min before intravenous injection of 10 mg of MTCL) and phase B (10 min after the injection) in the male and female groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.025) and between phase A and phase C (the additional 10 min after the injection) in both groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). The mean level of dfFO in the female group was significantly higher than that of the male group in phase B (P < 0.05). As a control, the experimental procedure was performed with physiological saline administration, and no changes were observed. The data suggest that there exists some difference between young males and females generation concerning sensitivity to dopamine and that young females may show a higher-than-male sensitivity to dopamine in the occurrence of FO potential.
Publisher
Tottori University Faculty of Medicine
Content Type
Journal Article
ISSN・ISBN
1346-8049
NCID
AA00892882
Journal Title
Yonago Acta medica
Current Journal Title
Yonago Acta medica
Volume
48
Issue
4
Start Page
83
End Page
92
Published Date
2005-12
Text Version
Publisher
Rights
Yonago Acta medica 編集委員会
Citation
Yonago Acta medica. 2005, 48(4), 83-92
Department
Faculty of Medicine/Graduate School of Medical Sciences/University Hospital
Language
English