ID 13700
File
Authors
Iida, Yuki Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University
Komatsu, Hiroaki Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University
Okawa, Masayo Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University
Osaku, Daiken Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University
Nosaka, Kanae Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB
Sato, Shinya Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Oishi, Tetsuro Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Taniguchi, Fuminori Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Harada, Tasuku Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Keywords
endometrial cancer
lymphovascular space invasion
prognosis
recurrent risk
Abstract
Background: We investigated whether there was a difference in prognosis between patients with stage IA endometrial cancer with and without lymphovascular space invasion. Methods: We enrolled patients with stage IA (pT1aN0M0) endometrial cancer admitted to our hospital from 2009 to 2018. All patients underwent hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy. We immunopathologically evaluated the presence or absence of lymphovascular space invasion in the tumor tissue using hematoxylin and eosin, Elastica-van Gieson, and podoplanin staining. We analyzed disease-free and overall survival and calculated patients’ survival distribution using the Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test. The multivariate analysis was performed to determine the prognostic factors. Results: A total of 116 patients were included. The median age of the patients was 57 (range, 30–78) years, and the histological subtype revealed 98 and 18 cases of types 1 and 2, respectively. The median follow-up period was 71.9 (range, 10.8–149) months, and the 3-year disease-free and 3-year overall survival rates were 94% and 99%, respectively. The disease-free and overall survival rates were significantly shorter in type 2 patients than in type 1 patients (type 2 vs. type 1; 77% vs. 97%, P < 0.01, 94% vs. 100%, P = 0.014, respectively). The univariate and multivariate analyses showed that there were no significant differences in disease-free survival between the lymphovascular space invasion-positive and -negative groups among type 1 cases. Conclusion: There was no difference in prognosis between patients with stage IA and type 1 endometrial cancer with and without lymphovascular space invasion.
Publisher
Tottori University Medical Press
Content Type
Journal Article
Link
ISSN
05135710
EISSN
13468049
NCID
AA00892882
Journal Title
Yonago Acta Medica
Current Journal Title
Yonago Acta Medica
Volume
65
Issue
1
Start Page
82
End Page
87
Published Date
2022-02-22
Publisher-DOI
Text Version
Publisher
Rights
(C) 2022 Tottori University Medical Press.
Citation
Yonago Acta Medica. 2022, 65(1), 82-87. doi10.33160/yam.2022.02.014
Department
Faculty of Medicine/Graduate School of Medical Sciences/University Hospital
Language
English