ID 13705
File
Authors
Chikumi, Jun Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University
Oishi, Tetsuro Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University / Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Matsue City Hospital Researchers DB KAKEN
Nakaso, Takaya Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University
Sawada, Mayumi Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University
Kudoh, Akiko Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University
Komatsu, Hiroaki Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University
Sato, Shinya Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Taniguchi, Fuminori Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Harada, Tasuku Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Keywords
adenomyosis
endometrial cancer
gynecologic oncology
Abstract
Uterine adenomyosis is an estrogen-dependent tumor and one of the most common benign diseases in sexually mature women. The frequency of endometrial cancer associated with adenomyosis has been reported to be 18%–66%. On the other hand, endometrial cancer arising in adenomyosis (EC-AIA) is extremely rare. EC-AIA is now considered a different entity from and has a worse prognosis than endometrial cancer with adenomyosis (EC-A). In the present study, we report a case of endometrial cancer with adenomyosis in which endometrial biopsy failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. A 63-year-old female patient presented with endometrial thickening. Endometrial cytology was positive, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed small lesions suggestive of endometrial cancer with shallow invasion and adenomyosis. However, an endometrial biopsy showed only metaplasia, and careful follow-up was initiated. Subsequent endometrial cytology showed enlarged and round nuclei, uniform chromatin distribution, no thickening of nuclear margins, and abundant cytoplasm appearing in a sheet-like arrangement, suggesting atypical cells of endometrial glands with metaplasia. Three suspicious positive results and one positive result were observed, but repeated biopsies did not lead to the diagnosis of malignancy. The patient underwent diagnostic hysterectomy 19 months after the initial visit. The postoperative histopathological diagnosis was stage IA endometrial cancer (endometrioid carcinoma G1). This case of endometrial cancer associated with adenomyosis was difficult to diagnose. Our findings demonstrate that EC-AIA should be considered even if no lesions were detected by endometrial biopsy.
Publisher
Tottori University Medical Press
Content Type
Journal Article
Link
ISSN
05135710
EISSN
13468049
NCID
AA00892882
Journal Title
Yonago Acta Medica
Current Journal Title
Yonago Acta Medica
Volume
65
Issue
1
Start Page
106
End Page
110
Published Date
2022-02-22
Publisher-DOI
Text Version
Publisher
Rights
(C) 2022 Tottori University Medical Press.
Citation
Yonago Acta Medica. 2022, 65(1), 106-110. doi10.33160/yam.2022.02.009
Department
Faculty of Medicine/Graduate School of Medical Sciences/University Hospital
Language
English