ID 7451
File
Authors
Fujii, J Division of Bacteriology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Mizoue, T Department of Epidemiology and International Health, Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan
Kita, T Department of Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health
Kishimoto, H Saitama Children's Medical Center
Joh, K Saitama Children's Medical Center
Nakada, Y Utsunomiya City Institute of Public Health and Environment
Ugajin, S Utsunomiya City Institute of Public Health and Environment
Naya, Y Utsunomiya City Public Health Office
Nakamura, T Utsunomiya City Public Health Office
Tada, Y Infectious Disease Surveillance Center (IDSC), National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID)
Okabe, N Infectious Disease Surveillance Center (IDSC), National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID)
Maruyama, Y Kagawa Prefectural Chusan Regional Health and Welfare Office
Saitoh, K Kagawa Prefectural Shozu Regional Health and Welfare Office
Kurozawa, Y Division of Health Administration and Promotion, Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Keywords
Gb3
haemolytic uraemic syndrome
HUS
STEC
Abstract
Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections usually cause haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) equally in male and female children. This study investigated the localization of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in human brain and kidney tissues removed from forensic autopsy cases in Japan. A fatal case was used as a positive control in an outbreak of diarrhoeal disease caused by STEC O157:H7 in a kindergarten in Urawa in 1990. Positive immunodetection of Gb3 was significantly more frequent in female than in male distal and collecting renal tubules. To correlate this finding with a clinical outcome, a retrospective analysis of the predictors of renal failure in the 162 patients of two outbreaks in Japan was performed: one in Tochigi in 2002 and the other in Kagawa Prefecture in 2005. This study concludes renal failure, including HUS, was significantly associated with female sex, and the odds ratio was 4·06 compared to male patients in the two outbreaks. From 2006 to 2009 in Japan, the risk factor of HUS associated with STEC infection was analysed. The number of males and females and the proportion of females who developed HUS were calculated by age and year from 2006 to 2009. In 2006, 2007 and 2009 in adults aged >20 years, adult women were significantly more at risk of developing HUS in Japan.
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Content Type
Journal Article
Link
ISSN
09502688
EISSN
14694409
Journal Title
EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION
Current Journal Title
EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION
Volume
144
Issue
5
Start Page
952
End Page
961
Published Date
2016-04
Publisher-DOI
Text Version
Publisher
Rights
© Cambridge University Press 2015
Citation
Fujii J., Mizoue T., Kita T., et al. Risk of haemolytic uraemic syndrome caused by shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in adult women in Japan. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION. 2016. 144(5). 952-961. doi:10.1017/S0950268815002289
Department
Faculty of Medicine/Graduate School of Medical Sciences/University Hospital
Language
English
Web of Science Key ut
WOS:000371720700006