ID 822
File
Authors
Keywords
β3-Adrenergic receptor
impaired glucose tolerance
multiple risk factors
non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
Trp64Arg polymorphism
Abstract
In order to investigate whether the Trp64Arg (a missense mutation of tryptophan for arginine at position 64 codon) polymorphism of the β3-adrenergic receptor (β3-AR) gene is related to the incidence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), a retrospective cohort study among Japanese workers was conducted. The subjects were Japanese workers at an occupational site in Shimane Prefecture. Informed consent was obtained from 492 workers. The baseline data were obtained at the regular health examination in 1992 and a retrospective cohort study was performed for analyzing the incidence of NIDDM and IGT in 1998. The Trp64Arg polymorphism β3-AR gene for each worker was detected by the single strand conformation polymerase analysis. Relative risks were calculated by the logistic regression analysis. The rates of Trp64Trp (TT), Trp64Arg (TA) and Arg64Arg (AA) genotypes were 66.3%, 31.1% and 2.6%, respectively. The relative risk of (TA + AA) against TT for the incidence of NIDDM and IGT by univariate analysis was 1.37 (95% incidence of NIDDM and IGT adjusted for confounders in a multiple logistic regression model including age, gender, family history, body mass index, alcohol consumption, eating habits and exercise was 1.31 (95% confidence interval, 0.65-2.67). The present findings suggested that a weak association between Trp64Arg polymorphism of the β3-AR gene and the incidence of NIDDM and IGT.
Publisher
Tottori University Faculty of Medicine
Content Type
Journal Article
ISSN
1346-8049
NCID
AA00892882
Journal Title
Yonago Acta medica
Current Journal Title
Yonago Acta medica
Volume
44
Issue
1
Start Page
55
End Page
59
Published Date
2001-03
Text Version
Publisher
Rights
Yonago Acta medica 編集委員会
Citation
Yonago Acta medica. 2001, 44(1), 55-59
Department
Faculty of Medicine/Graduate School of Medical Sciences/University Hospital
Language
English