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Title Transcription
ヒョウゴケン キタタジマ チイキ ニオケル テイイ ブナリン トソノ ソンリツ ジョウケン
Title Alternative
Kow-altitude forest of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata) in the northern Tajima District, Hyogo Prefecture, and its prerequisites
Authors
Shimizu, Hiroatsu Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Education and Regional Sciences, Tottori University
Yano, Takao Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Education and Regional Sciences, Tottori University KAKEN
Keywords
ブナ
但馬
暖かさの指数
最深積雪
裏日本気候区
レリック
遺存
Japanese beech
Tajima
warmth index
maximum snow-depth
Japan Sea climate
relic
Abstract
Beech forests characterized by Fagus crenata of F. japonica are distributed at abnormal low altitudes, down to 150 meters above sea level, in the northern Tajima district on the Japan Sea side, southwestern Japan. The abnormal low-altitudes are investigated to have been resulted from (1) marked lowering of the beech zone in snowy area, (2) large snow depths in the northern Tajima district and (3) escaping from severe human disturbance since the beginning of agriculture, particularly during the high economic growth period. The following two factors promote the lowering of the beech zone in snowy area: Creeping and avalanching of deep snow tend to destroy most small trees, but young beech can endure through crawling and triangulating their stem profiles. While large animals as hares and serows feed preferably winter buds and sprouts of deciduous trees, especially of beech, deep snow cover in the district protects from the browsing of animals. In addition, the large longevity of beech up to 400 years probably contributes to preserve the lowered distributions. Deep snow in the district is attributable to the large relief of the Hyonosen mountain mass behind. The mountain mass elevates the water-saturated winter wind that has traveled over the warm Japan Sea water from the cooled and dried Asian continent. Human activities destroyed most of natural forests in Japan, but small human population in the mountainous northern Tajima district reduced the destructive effects. The spot forests of beech are thus preserved as relicts of previous one extensive over the district. Many of them are left to protect villages from slope disasters. The spot forests seem to have potentials to grow over the snowy area, so that it is not impossible for us to revive them with suitable supports.
Publisher
鳥取大学教育地域科学部
Content Type
Departmental Bulletin Paper
ISSN
1345-3335
NCID
AA11424966
Journal Title
鳥取大学教育地域科学部紀要. 地域研究
Current Journal Title
Tottori University journal of the Faculty of Education and Regional Sciences. Regional Sciences
Volume
3
Issue
1
Start Page
111
End Page
131
Published Date
2001-07
Text Version
Publisher
Rights
注があるものを除き、この著作物は日本国著作権法により保護されています。 / This work is protected under Japanese Copyright Law unless otherwise noted.
Citation
鳥取大学教育地域科学部紀要. 地域研究. 2001, 3(1), 111-131
Department
Faculty of Regional Sciences/Graduate School of Regional Sciences
Language
Japanese