File
Authors
Kuwabara, Yuki Division of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB
Kinjo, Aya Division of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Fujii, Maya Division of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB
Minobe, Ruriko National Institute of Alcoholism, Kurihama National Hospital
Maesato, Hitoshi National Institute of Alcoholism, Kurihama National Hospital
Higuchi, Susumu National Institute of Alcoholism, Kurihama National Hospital
Yoshimoto, Hisashi Primary Care and Medical Education, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Majors of Medical Science, University of Tsukuba
Jike, Maki Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Faculty of Life and Environmental Science, Showa Women's University
Otsuka, Yuichiro Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Nihon University
Itani, Osamu Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Nihon University
Kaneita, Yoshitaka Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Nihon University
Kanda, Hideyuki Department of Public Health, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Osaki, Yoneatsu Division of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Keywords
brief intervention
excessive alcohol drinking
prevention
workplace
Abstract
Background: Despite evidence regarding the effectiveness of screening and brief interventions for excessive alcohol use in primary care, these tools are not a part of routine practice. It has been suggested that using these tools at the workplace may be critical to alcohol-associated harm; however, evidence for this claim is unclear. The aim of this article is to develop a study protocol which evaluates the effect of brief alcohol intervention at the workplace to reduce harmful alcohol drinking. Methods: A randomized controlled trial involving employees (aged 20–74 years) of five Japan-based companies who were screened “positive” by Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) is on-going. Participants were randomized into “Patient Information Leaflet” (control group), “Brief Advice and Counselling,” and “Five-minute Brief Advice” groups. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess alcohol consumption, lifestyle behavior, health status, work performance, and consequences of alcohol use. Data of laboratory markers were collected from routine health checkups.Results: A total of 351 participants were randomized into Patient Information Leaflet (n = 111), Brief Advice and Counselling (n = 128), and Five-minute Brief Advice (n = 112) groups. Participants were mostly men with a median age of 49 years. Median AUDIT score and weekly alcohol consumption were 11 points and 238 g/week, respectively. Two-thirds of the participants were manufacturing workers. Conclusion: This study protocol developed the first trial in Japan to investigate the effect of brief alcohol intervention combined with a recommended screening tool at the workplace. Our findings can provide evidence on the effectiveness and relevance of these tools to occupational health.
Publisher
Tottori University Medical Press
Content Type
Journal Article
Link
ISSN
05135710
EISSN
13468049
NCID
AA00892882
Journal Title
Yonago Acta Medica
Current Journal Title
Yonago Acta Medica
Volume
64
Issue
4
Start Page
330
End Page
338
Published Date
2021-11-29
Publisher-DOI
Text Version
Publisher
Rights
(C) 2021 Tottori University Medical Press.
Citation
Kuwabara Y, Kinjo A, Fujii M, et al. Effectiveness of Screening and Brief Alcohol Intervention at the Workplace: A Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial at Five Japan-Based Companies. Yonago Acta Medica. 2021, 64(4), 330-338. doi:10.33160/yam.2021.11.002
Department
Faculty of Medicine/Graduate School of Medical Sciences/University Hospital
Language
English