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Authors
Otani, Shinji International Platform for Dryland Research and Education, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Funaki Ishizu, Satomi Division of Health Administration and Promotion, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University
Masumoto, Toshio Division of Health Administration and Promotion, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB
Amano, Hiroki Division of Health Administration and Promotion, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Kurozawa, Youichi Division of Health Administration and Promotion, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University Researchers DB KAKEN
Keywords
heat stroke
minimum air temperature
ambulance transport
elderly
Abstract
An increase in the global surface temperature and changes in urban morphologies are associated with increased heat stress especially in urban areas. This can be one of the contributing factors underlying an increase in heat strokes. We examined the impact of summer minimum air temperatures, which often represent nighttime temperatures, as well as a maximum temperature on a heat stroke. We collected data from the records of daily ambulance transports for heat strokes and meteorological data for July and August of 2017–2019 in the Tottori Prefecture, Japan. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to determine the association of maximum/minimum air temperatures and the incidence of heat strokes. We used a logistic regression to identify factors associated with the severity of heat strokes. A total of 1108 cases were identified with 373 (33.7%) calls originating in the home (of these, 59.8% were the age of ≥ 75). A total of 65.8% of cases under the age of 18 were related to exercise. Days with a minimum temperature ≥ 25 °C had an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 3.77 (2.19, 6.51) for the incidence of an exercise-related heat stroke (reference: days with a minimum temperature < 23 °C). The odds ratio for a heat stroke occurring at home or for calls for an ambulance to the home was 6.75 (4.47, 10.20). The severity of the heat stroke was associated with older age but not with air temperature. Minimum and maximum air temperatures may be associated with the incidence of heat strokes and in particular the former with non-exertional heat strokes.
Publisher
MDPI
Content Type
Journal Article
Link
EISSN
16604601
Journal Title
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH
Volume
18
Issue
4
Start Page
1632
Published Date
2021-02
Publisher-DOI
Text Version
Publisher
Rights
(C) 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Citation
Otani Shinji, Funaki Ishizu Satomi, Masumoto Toshio, et al. The Effect of Minimum and Maximum Air Temperatures in the Summer on Heat Stroke in Japan: A Time-Stratified Case-Crossover Study. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH. 2021. 18(4). doi:10.3390/ijerph18041632
Department
Affiliated Institutes
Language
English
Web of Science Key ut
WOS:000623632900001